16 12 / 2011

Last day at the office.

Last day at the office.

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16 12 / 2011

Chris Holt  |  Features Editor  |  @bicyclesquid

After a couple days spent soul-searching, I think I’m most thankful for the opportunity to come into work every day and talk about video games with some of my best friends. 

When a lot of us joined GamePro, we knew that the state of affairs for the brand (and the industry at large) was dire. But we pulled together and produced a product I think we’re all genuinely proud of. For me, I wouldn’t have done it any differently. No regrets.

Even in the worst of times, I’ve never worked with a better group of people than the GamePro staff. I owe an incredible debt to my fellow writers and editors for helping me forge my voice on the site, by giving me criticism and encouragement when needed most. I hope the readers appreciate that this is a unique group of people who genuinely enjoyed each others’ company, loved video games, and loved talking about games. And to our readers, I need to thank you for being so supportive and conversational. Too often does journalism feel like you’re sending off text into a void, but with our readers, it felt more like a larger bullpen where everyone’s voice was heard.

Thank you all for a great time. Godspeed. 

05 12 / 2011

Karen Chu  |  Art Director  |  @momopeche

I really wanted this GamePro feature to happen:

GAMEPRO’S TOP 10 2 THUGS-TURNED-INTO-ANIMALS

2. Rocksteady

1. Bebop

Thanks for dropping by.

We miss you already.

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05 12 / 2011

05 12 / 2011

Tom Price  |  Executive Editor  |  @tomelet

I, like most of the staff, was a recent acquisition of GamePro Media. Most of us, save stalwarts like Patrick Shaw and Chris Parisi, were only here for the final death throes of the empire, not that we expected them so soon, or ever treated our jobs that way. We all fully believed we could turn around a once great media franchise, even if the deck was staffed against us. What GamePro was over the last year or so was the result of a group of talented and hungry individuals giving it their all, and I think that it showed. 

Myself, I knew what I was getting in to when I signed on. Print media is in trouble of going the way of the telegraph or the pay phone, so the thought of producing a high quality magazine with interesting informative content you couldn’t necessarily find online was a daunting one indeed. But I was excited to give it a shot. But I was only a veteran relief pitcher, brought in to a game we were losing. I definitely didn’t think I was the closer, I was just trying to hold us to extra innings. I may have done my job, but I’m obviously disappointed with the outcome. 

The young team around me played hard as well, and should hang their heads high in defeat. They are all future stars in this league. Often I found myself pondering how young they all were, about the age I was when I got started in this industry. Of course, that means I’m one of the bearded old-timers that mentored me in those early years. So if I have one regret, it’s not getting to fulfill my duties help mentor these young writers for a bit longer.

Who knows what exactly lies down the road for all of us. But speaking for myself, I have no regrets about taking on this mission in the first place. I’m honored to add my name to the rolls of great people who haunted the halls of GamePro over the last 20 odd years, and honored to have served the GamePro community, whether they were new visitors or had been reading the magazine since issue #1. Thanks to all of you for reading us and supporting us over the years. You made GamePro a household name.

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05 12 / 2011

Jaz Rignall  |  VP, Content  |  @jazrignall

I first saw GamePro back in the very early 90’s, when I was a British gaming journalist coming to the US to attend the CES Show – before the games part of the expo was spun out into what eventually became E3. The magazine was filled with games that wouldn’t arrive in the UK for months, and even years, so I bought a copy and used it as a reference guide – and ultimately became a regular subscriber.

It’s definitely a magazine of the period. Looking back at it now, it’s pretty hilarious: bright, colorful and full of weird cartoons. The writing is similarly 90’s, filled with mega awesome over-the-top commentary that, particularly with the benefit of hindsight, is sometimes very hit-and-miss. But then, that’s what gives the magazine charm. It’s a cultural reference guide to everything that was cool at the time.

We tried to recapture some of that feeling over the last year – bringing back that original by-gamers-for-gamers vibe, and I think we did add a bit of new energy and personality in that sense, reflected in the fact that we took GamePro.com to its highest readership in its 12-year existence.

But unfortunately it was a bit too late for GamePro, and now it represents a particular period in gaming history, which I am very proud to have been a part of.

05 12 / 2011

McKinley Noble  |  Staff Editor  |  @KenTheGreat1
  
For me, being a part of GamePro for four years was a lifetime achievement.
 
Ever since I was just a little kid growing up on the far side of Turlock, California, all I wanted to do with my life was get paid to write about video games. Way back then, it felt like the whole industry revolved around my three favorite magazines: GamePro, Nintendo Power, and Electronic Gaming Monthly. Whatever I couldn’t get through subscription deals, I’d scrimp and save my lunch money to buy newsstand issues, poring over every page, wishing that I could someday know what it was like to have the coolest job on the planet.
 
In fact, GamePro was the first job that meant everything to me. Even as an intern, I was at the office more than I was at college. Patrick and Tae would always catch me working in the dead of night alongside Will, and I’d even sleep overnight in demo room more than a few times a month during crunch time.
 
Almost two decades later, I can look back and be nothing but proud of everything we’ve done. Even through all the staff cuts, budget reductions, and the general shrinkage of the gaming media, we kept GamePro relevant at a time when Internet blogs were taking over everything. Sure, there may come a day when every single gaming outlet not attached to a giant media company is dead, but that’s the breaks. We fought the good fight. Instead of going down with the rest of the country when the economy first started tanking, we spent four long, hard years reinventing GamePro before going out on our shields.
 
So, thanks to everyone at GamePro who’s been part of our 22-year history. We went out in style. My life is all the better for having worked here with you.
 
 
 
Bang.

05 12 / 2011

05 12 / 2011

Will Herring  |  Associate Editor  |  @gp_greyscale

GamePro has been quite a few things to me over the years. It was a magazine that I read throughout my youth, it was a website that I visited as a young adult, it was an internship that I found myself plugging away at during college, and, in a turn of events that would’ve very much pleased 10 year-old Will, it somehow turned into my first full-time job shortly thereafter. I’ve seen it through the good and the bad, the reinventions and the revitalizations, the crises and the conventions, and, four years later, I legitimately couldn’t be prouder of what we’ve all accomplished as GamePros in our own right. I’ve seen so many people contribute to it, and put themselves into it, and become a part of it, and, based on what it ended up as, I do think it’s attracted only the best kinds of people. We made something special here, and I can walk away from GamePro Towers knowing that we gave it our very best effort up until the last second. GamePro’s a part of all of us, and I do believe that it always will be.

05 12 / 2011

Pete Davison  |  Contributing Editor  |  @angryjedi

As a Brit, I have to admit that GamePro didn’t mean much to me until my brother John Davison moved to the States and, following time on EGM, the Official PlayStation Magazine and 1up, took on GamePro for a ten month stint. In dealing with the difficult transition from print to online that the whole industry was (and still is) going through, he turned the GamePro brand from something which perhaps hadn’t moved with the times as much as it could have into the excellent, respected, trusted publication it became. This legacy was ably continued following his departure by the team who saw the brand to its eventual, unexpected and premature resting place.

From a personal perspective, I’d had writing gigs before, but GamePro was my first full-time professional writing job — well after my bro had left, before any accusations of nepotism come flying my way! I’m honored to have been part of GamePro, and sorry to have seen it go under just as I believe it was really starting to hit its stride in the cutthroat market of 21st century publishing. As a team, we (and everyone who has come before) left an indelible mark on games writing and gamer culture at large, and we should all be proud of that.

05 12 / 2011

GamePro #273. By Andrew Yang http://stitchmind.com

GamePro #273. By Andrew Yang http://stitchmind.com

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05 12 / 2011

Patrick Shaw  |  Senior Editor  |  @patrickshaw

Working at GamePro over the last six years has been an incredible ride. I’ve seen GamePro as a brand, a community, and a publication, go through tremendous changes—and as a result of being part of that, I have grown a lot with the company, too. It’s something that I’ll always be proud of. And I’m fortunate to have met so many great people over the years. Thank you to all our readers for their love and support (and even their occasional venom).  

Till next time. 

This is Patrick Shaw signing off.

05 12 / 2011

Emanuel Maiberg  |  Editorial Assistant  |  @BergBlog

Things were already changing rapidly when I arrived at GamePro more than a year ago, but every change I’ve seen has been for the better, and I am extremely proud to have been part of the team of people who made GamePro what it was in its last days. We launched an amazing new quarterly, breathed new life into our website, and produced tons of unique content which I enjoyed as both a professional writer and an unabashed gaming nerd. I’m sad to see the GamePro go because the brand was never as good as it was when it came to an end, but I’m looking forward to see and hopefully be a part of whatever my talented colleagues will do next.

05 12 / 2011

Olivia Hubert  |  Staff Editor  |  @speakeasywylie

Between my strict parents and only child upbringing, my all-too-limited experience with video games came from spending the night at friends’ houses, cramming a childhood of SNES and Genesis games into a handful of Friday nights, my classic GameBoy, and Gamepro magazine. What feels like a lifetime later, I was lucky enough to find a Craigslist posting from the media company that had such a welcome impact on my childhood, and within a month I had started as GamePro’s Editorial Intern. It was my last semester of college, and eleven months later, I can look back and say that my experience with GamePro Media, both online and in print, has been a non-stop wave of opportunity — one that has, ironically, ended in an abrupt and permanent wipe-out.

In my year’s worth of experience, starting as an intern, accepting my first promotion to become an Editorial Assistant, and moving all the way up to join McKinley on the Staff Editor branch, I’ve had one of the best rides of my life. I’ve met a staff of creative, talented, intelligent, hard-working, driven people, and we came together to produce a quality product. Our team is going out with a bang as far as numbers are concerned, and I’m honored to have a place in that.

It’s strange sitting here, typing this out on a Monday, when I would otherwise be planning two or three news stories, badgering the rest of the editors with blurbs for GP Staff features, and thinking about joining the oft-hourly battle of wits, a common occurrence for our quippy bullpen. Half an hour ago, the website we worked so hard to improve has been taken offline, and with it, all the discourse — vulgar, trollish, misspelled, but sometimes spot on — we’ve ever had with our readers and fans. Thank you for keeping us in line, giving us shit, talking inappropriately about our mothers, and sharing your opinions. See you around.

05 12 / 2011

Mooncat by Eric Sapp. http://eric-sapp.com/

Mooncat by Eric Sapp. http://eric-sapp.com/